Developed countries, while not legally required to contribute to the mitigation and adaptation efforts of developing countries, are encouraged to provide financial assistance and are held accountable for the funding they provide or are mobilized. Since Trump`s announcement, U.S. envoys – as well as on behalf – have continued to participate in U.N. climate negotiations to shore up the details of the agreement. Meanwhile, thousands of heads of state and government have intervened across the country to fill the void created by the lack of federal climate leadership, reflecting the will of the vast majority of Americans who support the Paris agreement. City and state officials, business leaders, universities and individuals included a base amount to participate in initiatives such as America`s Pledge, the United States Climate Alliance, We Are Still In and the American Cities Climate Challenge. Complementary and sometimes overlapping movements aim to deepen and accelerate efforts to combat climate change at the local, regional and national levels. Each of these efforts focuses on the willingness of the United States to work toward the goals of the Paris Agreement, despite Trump`s attempts to lead the country in the opposite direction. A strong climate agreement, supported by measures on the ground, will help us achieve the Sustainable Development Goals to end poverty, build stronger economies and create safer, healthier and more livable societies everywhere. There are 12 of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals that directly involve taking action to combat climate change, in addition to the fact that climate change has its own goal. The authors of the agreement have set a withdrawal period that President Trump must follow – which prevents him from irreparably harming our climate. The adoption of the agreement sends a message to the world that countries are taking the fight against climate change seriously. It is a remarkable triumph that the 196 parties to the Convention have reached this agreement.

Currently, 197 countries – every nation on earth, the last signatory is war-torn Syria – have adopted the Paris Agreement. 179 of them have consolidated their climate proposals with official approval, including, for the time being, the United States. The only major emitters that have yet to formally accede to the agreement are Russia, Turkey and Iran. Recognizing that many developing countries and small island developing states that have contributed the least to climate change are most likely to suffer the consequences, the Paris Agreement contains a plan for developed countries – and others that are able to do so – to continue to provide financial resources to help developing countries reduce and increase their capacity to withstand climate change. The agreement builds on the financial commitments of the 2009 Copenhagen Accord, which aimed to increase public and private climate finance to developing countries to $100 billion per year by 2020. (To put it in perspective, in 2017 alone, global military spending amounted to about $1.7 trillion, more than a third of which came from the United States. The Copenhagen Pact also created the Green Climate Fund to mobilize transformation funding with targeted public dollars. The Paris agreement expected the world to set a higher annual target by 2025 to build on the $100 billion target by 2020 and create mechanisms to achieve this. The agreement offers a way forward to limit the temperature increase to a level well below 2 degrees, perhaps even 1.5 degrees. The agreement provides a mechanism to raise the level of ambitions. The Paris Agreement will be signed in 2016 by the signatories of the UNFCCC 195. The agreement aims to reduce and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.